Tag Archives: Christmas

Benediction for December 10, 2017

People of God,

The Lord of Love opens wide his arms to you today.

We are the biggest stumbling block in our relationship with God.

Let us get out of our own way.

Let us see God in the love born this Christmas.

Go with Love birthed in your hearts.

Go with the Christ-Child, Amen.

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Advent Candles Lighting 2017

LIGHTING THE HOPE CANDLE

 

This year has been devastating…

Wildfires, hurricanes, shootings, turmoil

It would be so easy to give in to apathy,

to let our hearts grow dark with despair.

But there is a light shining in the darkness.

(the candle is lit)

A single candle, a small voice, a still reminder…

Hope.

Hope in the Word proclaimed by the prophets.

Hope.

Hope in the Promise of Emmanuel.

Hope.

Hope in the birth of our Savior.

Hope.

 

LIGHTING THE LOVE CANDLE

 

She places a hand on her belly to feel the kicking from within as they journey down the road toward Bethlehem…

a Babe will be born, a Savior will arrive, Love will come down.

The lost world pushes on drudgingly, slaves to a never ending care-less-ness.

It would be so easy to give in to apathy,

But there is a light shining in the cold winter.

(the candles are lit)

A simple hope, a wonderful gift…

Love.

Love nurtured by a Mother’s embrace…

Love.

Love shared from the Father’s strength…

Love.

Love in the birth of our Savior.

Love.

 

LIGHTING THE JOY CANDLE

 

Cheerless faces marching in the land of misery…

Chained to our desires, held captive by our regrets, slaves to our brokenness.

It would be so easy to give in to apathy,

to let our hearts grow deaf, our open lips mute with pain.

But there is a song shining in the silence.

(the candles are lit)

A simple hope, the gift of love, a song of joy…

Joy.

Joy brought the Angel’s song to the shepherds.

Joy.

Joy inspired the Wise to follow their starry dreams.

Joy.

Joy in the birth of our Savior.

Joy.

 

LIGHTING THE PEACE CANDLE

 

War affects more than those who are fighting.

Men, women, children, babies, refugees.

Turning a blind eye, pretending it isn’t our problem,

It would be so easy to give in to apathy.

But there is a light shining in the night.

(the candles are lit)

A simple hope, the gifts of love, a song of joy, the peace of Christ…

Peace.

Peace born in a prince lain in a manger.

Peace.

Peace waging in our hearts, seeking justice, offering mercy.

Peace.

Peace in the birth of our Savior.

Peace.

 

LIGHTING THE CHRIST CANDLE

 

(all the advent candles are lit)

She gives him a nod; he realizes it is time,

There is no room in the inn.

It would be so easy to give in to the apathy that surrounds them,

Yet they don’t give up, pressing on to the stable.

Light is born in the darkness.  A child is born unto you.

(the Christ candle is lit)

A simple hope, the gift of love, a song of joy, the peace of Christ…

His name is Jesus.

Wonderful, Counselor,

He is Emmanuel – God with us.

Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace,

He is the Christ child.

Amen.

“Traditions that won’t die – shaking the gift” from Luke 1:26-55

There are some Christmas Traditions that just won’t die – like shaking the package and trying to guess what’s inside.  As a child we all did it.  We waited until our parents weren’t in the room.  We began sizing up the packages in our mind with imaginary x-ray vision, prying at what might be inside.  We took out our list and checked it twice. Checking the size and shape of each package.

And if we were really quiet, and really sneaky, and really brave – we actually touched the packages.  With the same care an antiquities professor in a library handles a rare and fragile manuscript – we would pick up those mystery gifts wrapped in colorful paper with ribbons and bows.  Quieter than our parents could ever remember us being, we would gently shake the package, and if we were lucky, we would hear something rattle or rock within giving us giddy emotion about possibilities.

Could it be that new video game that everyone wants this year?  Would it be that doll we saw in the store?  What about the Drone or new phone we asked for?  Would Christmas day find us tearing off the paper to find exactly what we wanted?  No matter how we shook it, not matter what noises came from within the wrappings, we couldn’t and wouldn’t be sure until Christmas morning.

 

 Mary must have been feeling like that after the angel left.  There are two words that when you say them or hear them will change your life forever.  “I’m pregnant.”  For some, those words come as a shock.  As in this wasn’t the plan.  Attached to them are chains like “My life is over” and “I’m not ready.”  The future is cloudy with sudden realization of responsibility, nurturing, providing, and caring for another living being.

“I’m pregnant.”  For others these words come with hopeful surprise.  Attached to them are dreams of doll houses and catching balls.  The future is a bright sunny day with endless possibilities about what might lay in store for the new family.

Like a gift wrapped under the tree, one that we weren’t aware that we might be receiving, Mary goes through a flood of these emotions.  “I’m pregnant.”  At first, she was in shock. “How can this be.  I’ve never been with a man!”  “God this isn’t the way things are done down here.”

We’ve all told God this once or twice in our lives, maybe we’ve just used other words.  “Lord, if you’ll just let it happen this way…”  “God, what I really need is…”  “Jesus Christ, why can’t anything ever go my way!”  We shake the package. We size it up in our minds.  We try to tell our parents what it should be because we have this sinking feeling that it isn’t what we wanted it to be.

I’m sure Mary instinctively put her hand to her stomach as she said those unsure words, “I am God’s servant. Let it be with me just as you have said.”

According to Google Maps and most commentaries, it would take a person about one week to walk from Nazareth to Jerusalem in the ancient world.  We actually don’t know where Zechariah and Elizabeth lived. Scripture only says, “Judean Highlands” which describes a lot of territory.   But it probably was around or near Jerusalem – Zechariah being a priest.  It may have even been near Bethlehem as Adam Hamilton suggests.

So put yourself in Mary’s shoes.  An angel just told you your life is ruined. “I’m pregnant.”  You run to family, but preferably not mom and dad.  Maybe go and check out what the Angel said about cousin Elizabeth.  And you’ve got 7 to 9 days walk to think this thing through.   

It’s amazing how taking a walk can change your perspective.  All the research these days says that sitting is killing us.  Sitting in chairs at our offices, sitting in lazy-boys in front of television and devices.  Our sedentary lifestyle is killing us.  And it’s not just our physical health – walking is emotionally healthy.

Mary probably thanked God for the walk.  I imagine that Mary was deep in thought the whole way to Elizabeth’s house.  I imagine her praying to God and going through the different stages of grief.  “I’m pregnant. Not, that’s impossible.  Nothing is impossible with God.”  “I’m pregnant. Why did you pick me God?  Isn’t there a princess somewhere who’s better suited?”  Denial, Anger, Depression, Bargaining, Acceptance.  Mary must have traveled the gambit of the wheel of emotional response with each step she took south.

Walking helps her.  Her perspective does change.  She looks at her stomach with growing anticipation.  She sizes up this gift, wondering how it will fit into her life’s dreams.  She rubs her stomach wondering who he will be?  No matter how she shakes it, no matter what feelings come from within the wrappings, she couldn’t possibly be sure until Christmas.

But that doesn’t stop her from dreaming.   After her walk she praises God “With all my heart I glorify God.”  After her walk she realizes that this burden she thought she was carrying has become a blessing, “From now on, everyone will call me blessed.”  She realizes who God is and who God’s son will be

    • A man of mercy
    • One who lifts up the lowly and pulls the powerful off their thrones
    • Feeding the hungry
    • Coming the aid of the oppressed
    • A Savior – Jesus – Emmanuel – God with us.

Mary realizes that she has been given a gift.   

No matter what is under the Christmas Tree for you this year, one thing is true.  It doesn’t matter what kind of wrapping paper is on it.  It doesn’t matter how perfect the bow is tied or how big the box is.  It doesn’t even matter what it cost for the person to give it to you.  What matters is once you’ve opened it, how will you use it?  

No matter how you shake it, once you’ve opened the gift, you’ve got to decide what you will do with it now.  Will it be put on the shelf with other ‘things’ you own but never use?  Will it be put in storage with other gifts you’ve been given that you didn’t really want to receive but can’t quite bring yourself to get rid of because “even an ugly sweater from Aunt Cathy is still a gift from Aunt Cathy.”  Or will this gift be the gift that changes your life.   

A father took his two children to the mall to do a little shopping. As they drove up, four eager eyes spotted a Mack Truck parked with a big sign on it that said, “Petting Zoo.” The father knew what was coming.  The kids jumped up in a rush and asked, “Daddy, Daddy. Can we go? Please. Please. Can we go?”

Wanting to give his children a gift, the father said “Sure,” flipping them both a quarter before walking into the department store. They bolted away, and the father felt free to take his time looking for a Christmas gift for his wife.

A petting zoo consists of a portable fence erected in the mall with about six inches of sawdust and a hundred little furry baby animals of all kinds. Kids pay their money and stay in the enclosure enraptured with the squirmy little critters while their moms and dads shop.

A few minutes later, the father turned around and saw his little girl walking along behind him. He was shocked to see she preferred the department store to the petting zoo. Then he saw that she was crying.  He bent down and asked her what was wrong.

She looked up at him with sad brown eyes and said, “Well, Daddy, it cost fifty cents. So, I gave my brother my quarter.  It was an early Christmas gift for him.”

Together, the father and his daughter walked over to the Petting Zoo and watched her brother enjoy the gift she’d given.  The father watched as they stood there.  There was another two quarters burning a hole in his pocket that he was about to give her.  But as he watched his daughter, something changed.  The sadness disappeared.  The burden was lifted and became a blessing.  The gift she had given became a gift of joy for her.

She had opened an unexpected gift.  Without sizing it up beforehand, no shaking it, no guessing at what it could be.  She had simply tore open the gift of love and shared it with her brother, and in the sharing she had been the one who was blessed. 

Church, we’ve been given a gift.  “We’re pregnant.  We’re pregnant with baby Jesus.”  This unexpected gift has shocked us, surprised us, and got us wondering.  It doesn’t matter what kind of wrapping paper is on it.  It doesn’t matter how perfect the bow is tied or how big the box is.  It doesn’t even matter what it cost for God to give it to us.  We’ve been shaking it, guessing at what it might be, dreaming about what could be.  

Christmas is coming.  Once we’ve opened this gift, how will we experience Jesus? How will we share Jesus?  After all, that’s all that really matters anyway.

“Traditions that won’t die – Bicycles, BB Guns, and Stockings” from Matthew 1:18-25

There are some Christmas traditions that just won’t die – like Bicycles, BB guns, and Stockings.  We know what we want.  My mother always wanted a Christmas with everyone home, everyone happy, and no one arguing. The Norman Rockwell painting of a family gathered around the tree in absolute joy.  My father always wanted scratch off tickets that would win him enough to pay for the next ten years of Christmas gifts. That and a Christmas ham.  But neither was to happen.  Somehow my sister, brother, and I would always find something to argue about.  Someone (probably an uncle or an aunt) would call to let us know that they wouldn’t be coming for the family Christmas because they just couldn’t stand to be in the same room with so and so who had said something inappropriate last year after one to many.  Poor dad would have to suffer through getting another handkerchief or a pair of socks.  But he’d be happy because there would be ham.

Christmas is rarely what we want it to be.   We want it to be quiet and quaint, just our close friends and family; and yet it always seems to grow out of control like some frat party at college.  We want it to be peaceful like snowflakes falling from the sky, instead of the hectic pace of conflicting schedules, long lines, and exhausted feet.  And yes, we want snow. And just on Christmas day, so no one has to drive in it or get stuck sleeping on the couch at our house.  We want it to be like some Christmas we’re sure happened once upon a time and yet hasn’t seemed to ever be.

 

Christmas is rarely what we want it to be.  But don’t worry.  Calm down.  The first Christmas was that way, too.  Joseph and Mary were like any other couple in love.  They looked at one another with that wellspring of hope in their hearts.  They had plans for the future.  He’d continue expanding his small business of carpentry.  She’d probably picked out pots and fabrics for the home.  Their families were excited and expecting great things.  The wedding would be wonderful – two honorable families coming together in the union of this woman and this man.  And of course there were whispers about the little ones that would soon be additions to their families heritage, tradition, and honor.

But this was not to be.

Christmas was not what Joseph and Mary wanted it to be.  It came too soon.   Things were different in the ancient world.  Unlike today, a woman was only worth her womb.  She was worthy as a virgin before marriage.  She was worthy as a producer of children in marriage.  She was called to add honor to her husband.

I’m thankful that we’ve moved beyond this, but that was the situation for Mary.  Carrying the Son of God meant that she would lose worth in her families eyes.  Carrying Jesus meant that her virtue was now called into question.  Carrying Emmanuel meant that the world looked at her with disdain.

Christmas was not what Joseph and Mary wanted it to be.  It came too soon.   Things were different in the ancient world.  You couldn’t just throw the ring on the ground and walk away from an engagement.  To break off the engagement meant that Joseph was breaking a covenant, a promise, and a contract. Not only would people whisper about Mary, they would ask what was wrong with Joseph.  As the offended party, Joseph was supposed to make a big deal of this, he had the right to publicly humiliate Mary and her family. In fact that was what the law called for him to do.

Matthew describes Joseph and a “righteous” or “just” or “fair” man.  He doesn’t want to ruin Mary and her family.  He doesn’t want this to be a public affair.  He wants this all to be over quickly and quietly.

Christmas was not what Joseph and Mary wanted it to be.  Christmas is rarely what we want it to be.  We want a BB gun, “you’ll shoot your eye out!”  We want a bicycle we don’t know how to ride.  We want a happy family, someone is going to be on bad terms with someone. After all this is football season.  We want, but God provides what we need instead.

When I was a kid, my Christmas was always half of what I wanted and half of what I needed.  I knew immediately what the difference would be.  The packages fell into two categories:  hard and soft.  The hard ones were toys. The soft ones were clothing.  Once or twice my mom and dad fooled me by putting them in boxes, but this ‘feeling’ technique rarely failed me.   

God gives us what we need at Christmas, not just what we want.  There was a young wife and mother of two children whose husband was in the Air Force during one of the nation’s military conflicts. As Christmas approached, she gathered her children and headed for her parents’ home for the Christmas celebration. She arrived to find her parents’ home gaily decorated. The tree was glistening with lights and the presents were crammed beneath it. And, although her husband could not be present, it promised to be a happy time together.

 Then, on Christmas Eve, came the news that her husband had been killed in combat, and the woman was devastated. While she was upstairs crying in her room, her parents, who now felt that the decorations were suddenly inappropriate, began to take them down. The lights were unplugged and the gifts put in a closet. Later, when the new widow came down the stairs, she saw the decorations gone and the tree darkened. “Where is everything?” she asked. When her father explained, the young woman, with a wisdom beyond her years, said, “No. Bring them back! Christmas was made for such times as these.”  God touching our soul.

 Christmas is rarely what we want it to be.  But what if we let it be that way.  In a dream, God tells Joseph not to worry, but to marry Mary anyway.  With an angel, God tells Mary not to be afraid, but to be blessed.  What if this year we didn’t worry so much about getting Christmas perfect but allowed the imperfections to become blessings?  What if this year we loved one another in the same light that God loves each of us?  This year, let’s just be ourselves and let each other be who we are.

Christmas is rarely what we want it to be.  But don’t worry.  Calm down.  Emmanuel is the answer.  God IS with us.  Just because the bow on that present isn’t perfectly symmetrical doesn’t mean the child opening it won’t be surprised and blessed.  Just because the baby came before the marriage doesn’t mean that God doesn’t love you.  Just because you have the right to hurt someone doesn’t mean you should.  Just because you find yourself in a dark place, a blue Christmas, a winter wonderland of shadows, anger, and grief – doesn’t mean you are cursed.   

God loves you.  God is with you.  God made a special trip one time just to be with you.  It wasn’t necessarily the perfect plan:  an unwed mother, a father worried about public opinion, a backwater state in the midst of an oppressive empire; but it worked out.

 Christmas is rarely what we want it to be.  The first one definitely wasn’t what we’d think it should be.  But maybe that’s a part of the good news:  God loves us anyway.  God is with us, anyway.  God is calling us to be with one another and love one another, anyway.

 In Calcutta, India, outside of Shishu Bhavan, there hangs a sign that says:

People are unreasonable, illogical, and self-centered,

LOVE THEM ANYWAY

If you do good, people will accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives,

DO GOOD ANYWAY

If you are successful, you win false friends and true enemies,

SUCCEED ANYWAY

The good you do today will be forgotten tomorrow,

DO GOOD ANYWAY

Honesty and frankness make you vulnerable,

BE HONEST AND FRANK ANYWAY

What you spent years building may be destroyed overnight,

BUILD ANYWAY

People really need help but may attack you if you help them,

HELP PEOPLE ANYWAY

Give the world the best you have and you’ll get kicked in the teeth,

GIVE THE WORLD THE BEST YOU’VE GOT ANYWAY.

God loves you in spite of you.  This Christmas, in spite of family, friends, schedules, anxiety, and grief: love.  Christmas is messy.  Love the mess anyway.

“Traditions that won’t die – Christmas Trees” from Luke 1:76-80

There are some traditions that just won’t die – like decorating the Christmas Tree.  Some of my favorite Christmas memories revolve around the Christmas tree.  I’d watch impatiently as my father cussed and fussed with the artificial tree we had growing up. He’d be kneeling on the floor in front of the beaten up box that still had the Sears Roebucks sticker on the side.  He looked like he was paying homage to a giant green monster that was about to devour him in one colossal bite.  In the dim light he’d look for colors that had long worn off on the ends of branches, trying to decipher them like an archaeologist staring at the Rosetta stone. Reds and oranges looked like twins as did blacks and grays.

Meanwhile, mom would be sitting in the couch entrapped by miles of lights. She’d go light by light checking to make each strand work and blink at just the right rhythm.  Replacing bulbs and fuses in monotonous fashion.  She would giggle at my father’s frustration, humming songs about Rudolph, St. Nick, and Frosty.  Finally, when the tree was up and all the lights were on it. Mom would look at it once more.  She’d go up to each bubble light and encourage it with a tap.  She’d bend branches and add green fluffs to places where time had taken toll.  Then she’d turn my sister and I loose.

To say that we decorated the tree was to say that two midgets had the ability to slam dunk on the basketball court.  We decorated the tree from about midway down.  We were little after all.  With Burl Ives singing about mistletoe kisses in the background, we decorated the tree with those shiny balls (breaking two or three in the process).  We decorated the tree with arts and crafts that we had made at school and at church. Mom would smile when we hung our clothespin reindeer, our paper Santa with cotton ball beards, and of course our latest arts and crafts projects from school.  Then she’d politely ask, “Do we have to put your clay Freddie Kruegar on the Christmas tree?” Yes, even though I had never seen the movies, I had made a clay man with a claw for a hand and painted him bright bloody red.  “Mom, Freddie needs Christmas too!”

I never understood why ma and pa would let us decorate the tree.  She knew we were going to break some of the ornaments.  She knew we couldn’t reach all the way to the top.  After Sis and I went to bed we knew she was going to re-decorate the tree to her specifications.  And yet, she invited us to participate in this sacred moment, creating memories and experiencing love.

Christmas Trees are so much a part of our Christmas these days.  It’s no surprise I think that Christmas trees weren’t always a part of the Christmas holiday.  While people have been gathering around trees and decorating them for centuries, the first record of a decorated Christmas tree is not in Bethlehem. It happened in Riga, Latvia, in 1510.

Christmas Trees give life.  An acre of Christmas Trees provides enough oxygen for 18 people daily.

Christmas trees are a part of our nation’s story.  Christmas trees have been a part of the American Experience for a long time. In 1856, President Franklin Pierce was the first to place a Christmas Tree on the White House Lawn.  This tradition has been carried out since then with the exception of Republican President Teddy Roosevelt, who banned the National Christmas tree for religious and environmental reasons.

Christmas trees are a part of our faith story.  I can still remember sitting in the dark with my mother, watching the bubble lights glow and the twinkling reflections.  In the darkness, in the waiting, in the cold and bitter winter, Christmas trees remind us of God’s eternal love and the Light of Christ’s birth.  As Luke states, “God’s deep compassion, the dawn of heaven will break upon us, to give light to those who are sitting in darkness and in the shadow of death, to guide us on the path of peace.”

Times are dark.  Most of the trees have lost their leaves.  The world of nature is stark with dying colors – Fall’s parade of reds, yellows, and orange have given to bland browns.  Our community weeps as Suntrust bank closes down in town.  Life in winter struggles and slows down.  Sometimes the cold infects our hearts and our behaviors reflect selfish desires and sinful intent rather than generous giving or self-sacrifice.

Into this picture, Luke’s gospel introduces John  the Baptizer.  His Father, Zechariah, preaches in song about his life.  (Remember Zechariah, the old guy whose old wife suddenly has a baby?)  Now as a proud father, he preaches in song about his Son, John.  “You child will be called a prophet of the most high, for you will go before the Lord to prepare his way.”  For Zechariah, John’s message is one of hope, love, peace, and joy.  John brings a message that the light is coming.  John brings a message that forgiveness is coming.  John opens the gate to the way, the truth, and the life in Christ Jesus.  In this Gospel he wears his faith for all the world to see, and it is more than long hair and camel skin!

In a winter season, John is the Christmas Tree getting decorated for Christ’s birth.  He reminds us of God’s eternal love.  He shows us the way to Christ’s light being born in the darkness.  What’s more is that we are called to be like John.

We are called to be the Christmas Trees in the world today.  Like John, we are to remind the world that there is still life in these branches of green.  Like John, we are to point to the Christ light being born in the darkness.  Like John, we are called to come and prepare the way. Like my mother and father, God is trusting us with decorating the tree.

I never understood why ma and pa would let us decorate the tree.  She knew we were going to break some of the ornaments.  She knew we couldn’t reach all the way to the top.  After Sis and I went to bed we knew she was going to re-decorate the tree to her specifications.  And yet, she invited us to participate in this sacred moment, creating memories and experiencing love.

I don’t understand why God would trust us with sharing the news about Jesus.  God knows we’re going to break some of the commandments and be called hypocrites.  God knows we can’t reach heaven on our own let alone bring God’s kingdom here through our efforts.  After we’ve made a mess and failed, God is going to have to rework all the bad to recreate this world new, resurrected, reformed.  And yet, the Lord invites us to participate here, at this table, in this sacred moment, remembering, observing, creating new and experiencing love.  

There are some traditions that won’t die.  God’s love is one of them.

“Traditions that won’t die – Shopping for the perfect Gift” from John 1:1-14

There are some traditions that won’t die. If you were like most Americans – you’ve been searching for the perfect gift. Maybe you started your search this week: gravy still dripping down your chin, turkey still digesting in your stomach as you leapt through crowds and dodged quicker than any running back to get to that last one, limited time, Black Friday sale.

Maybe you’re more savvy than that…Back when Halloween costumes and Christmas Trees came out together, you saw the signs of the times.  You read between the lines when the minions came knocking at your door saying “Trick or Treat.”  You knew what they were really saying was “Trick or Treat – only 55 days left till Christmas – buy me a gift!”

Whether you do it online or in person, whether you prepare all year for it or let it sneak up on you with a bite of mistletoe – Brace yourself – Christmas is coming.  If you are like most – you’ve begun searching for the perfect gift for that person who is impossible to shop for.

There are some traditions that won’t die – and finding the perfect gift is one of them.  We all know what it’s not.  It’s not the ugly sweater from Aunt Cathy.  It’s not the yellow polka dotted suspenders I sent my dad this year.  Nor is it the gift basket of soaps and bathing oils – what are your relatives trying to say by giving you things to make you smell better?

And we know how to start fights about gifts.  Recently on Facebook a man posted this:

One year, I decided to buy my mother-in-law a cemetery plot as a Christmas gift. The next year I didn’t buy her a gift.  When she asked me why, I replied, “Well, you still haven’t used the gift I bought you last year!”  And that’s how the fight started.

In trying to find the perfect gift we drown in consumerism and hunger for meaning.  When we purchase more and find ourselves emptier than our wallets.  When we give till it hurts only to find the hurt is credit card debt.  When we realize we’re worried about schedules, menus, and forget to realize with the Grinch that Christmas is something that can’t be bought after all.

Finding the perfect gift is a lot like trying to decide which of the Seven Wonders of the World is the most wonderful.  A teacher assigned a class to write down a list of what they thought were the current Seven Wonders of the World.  Most of the students came back the pretty much the same list:

    • Egypt’s pyramids
    • Taj Mahal
    • The Grand Canyon
    • Panama Canal
    • Empire State Building
    • Peter’s Basilica
    • The Great Wall of China

One little girl had a difficult time with the assignment.  The teacher asked her, “are you having trouble with the assignment.”  “Yes,” she promptly said, “there are so many that it is hard to choose which should be number one.”  The teacher said, “Well, why don’t you share your list with the class and we’ll help you decide.”

“I think the Seven Wonders of the World are:

    • To see
    • To hear
    • To touch
    • To taste
    • To feel
    • To laugh
    • And to love.

The perfect gift is not made, manufactured, sold, and shipped through Amazon.com.  The perfect gift is not something you can charge on your credit card, save up for through your piggy bank, or earn through hard work.  If you are like most people – you are searching for the perfect gift.  

The perfect gift is what we look for during the Advent Season.  It was there in the very first moment of creation.  “In the Beginning was the Word.”  It wasn’t bought or sold, but instead was given freely as a self-sacrifice.  “The Word was with God and the Word was God.”  It was the perfect gift for us in our darkest hour.  “The light shines in the darkness and the darkness cannot extinguish it.”

The perfect gift we long for, the perfect gift we search for, the perfect gift we need more than ever this year – is Jesus.  Emmanuel.  God with us.  “The Word became flesh and dwelt among us.”

 This time of year the days grow short and it seems both in nature and in our spirits that the darkness is trying to overcome the light.  Evil is trying to beat goodness.  Commercialism, not secularism, is trying to kill Christmas.  

Perhaps that is why we celebrate Advent during this time of year.  To remember our need.  To remember his love.  To remember God’s gift.

Perhaps that is why we need candles lit in front of us each Sunday.  To give us light in dark times, to give us hope in the midst of grief and despair. for hope that the light of day will end night.

Funny thing about this gift God gives.  We have to be ready to receive it.   Advent calls us to get ready for Christ’s coming.  Be ready.  We have to open the gift.  Be ready to have our debt of sin paid in full. Be ready Jesus to shape and change our lives. Be ready to experience an amazing grace and a wonderful presence. Be ready to receive the perfect gift.

 A young man was getting ready to graduate from college. For many months he had admired a beautiful sports car in a dealer’s showroom, and knowing his father could well afford it, he told him that was all he wanted.

As Graduation Day approached, the young man awaited signs that his father had purchased the car. Finally, on the morning of his graduation, his father called him into his private study told him how proud he was to have such a fine son, and how much he loved him. He handed him a beautifully wrapped gift box.  Curious, but somewhat disappointed, the young man opened the box and found a lovely, leather-bound Bible, with his name embossed in gold. Angrily, he raised his voice to his father and said, “With all your money and power you give me a Bible?  I wanted a car!” He stormed out of the house, leaving the Bible behind.

Many years passed and the young man was very successful in business. He had a beautiful home and wonderful family, but realized his father was very old. He thought perhaps he should go to him. He had not seen him since that graduation day. But before he could make arrangements, he received a telegram telling him his father had passed away, and willed all of his possessions to him. He needed to come home immediately to take care of things.

When he arrived at his father’s house, sadness and regret filled his heart. He began to search through his father’s important documents and saw the Bible, new, just as he had left it years ago. With tears, he opened the Bible and began to turn the pages. His father had carefully underlined a verse,

Matt 7:11-  “If you who are evil know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your heavenly Father give good things to those who ask him”

As he read those words, a car key dropped from the back of the Bible. It had a tag with the dealer’s name, the same dealer who had the sports car he had desired. On the tag was the date of his graduation, and the words…PAID IN FULL.

There are some traditions that won’t die.  Advent is one of them.  This Advent Season, let’s get ready to receive the perfect gift.

Call to worship for Christmas season 2016

Raindrops on roses
And whiskers on kittens
Bright copper kettles
And warm woolen mittens
Brown paper packages tied up with strings
These are a few of my favorite things

This year let us be more focused on Christmas; Focused on Jesus instead of our wish list.
The gift of God blooms brighter than spring

Let Christmas time be our favorite thing.

 

When the poor come,

Let us feed them!

Give of what we have!

And then we’ll remember just why we sing

Christmas day is glad!

“Waiting, Watching, Wandering, Wondering…”

On Christmas Eve, we always hear the Christmas story from Luke 2 in the old King James and hear the end of the Shepherds tale, “And all who heard it wondered at those things which were told to them by the Shepherds.”  I worry that we’ve lost our wonder at Christmas.

We get caught up in the commercial gift giving.  We turn all sappy over photos and Christmas cards that are shared.  We dress the kids up in a manger scene for a naïve nativity.  We stress over what to get people who have too much.  We try to remember words to songs we sing only once a year.  Yet, when do we get lost in the wonder of it all.  When do we stop in awe of the gift from heaven, the gift of salvation, the gift of undeserved love, the gift of Christ?

This year, my youngest finally asked, “Is Santa Claus really real like Jesus is really real?”  I told him he used to be.  Santa Claus, or St. Nick was a real Christian who didn’t loose the wonder of Christ.  A rich man, St. Nicholas gave all he could for orphans so that they too might experience the wonder of undeserved love.  Today, we also need this wonder, this amazement, this shell shock at the birth announcement of our King.

Take time today to stand in awe among your family, friends, unwrapped gifts, and undeserved Savior.  Experience in your prayer the glory and the awe again.  God loves sinners like you and me.  Christ came for the world.  Wow…

“Pass out the Cigars – It’s not a boy” from Luke 2

Christmas Eve, 2014

Gospel Luke 2

Do you remember your first kiss?  The anticipation – because this is so going to be different than the pecks on the cheek Aunt Mary and Aunt Anna Lee give me.  The worry – because I’ve never done this before so what will it be like, will I be good, will she be good, what if we get stuck that way?  My first kiss was with Sherri Overall in 2nd grade.  We were playing house at her house.  She had on her mama’s high heels and costume jewelry.  I had on her daddy’s sports jacket.  All at once she came up to me and said, “have a good day!” and smacked one on me.  I didn’t know what to do so I smooched back tongue and all.  It didn’t end well.

A kiss is when two human beings reach out to one another.  We are attempting to touch each other’s soul.  We are making ourselves vulnerable – germs, disease, good kisser/bad kisser.  We are sharing ourselves wholly.  The Birth of Jesus wasn’t just the birth of a baby boy; it is a kiss blown from heaven to humanity.

Sure, we’d had flirtation with God before the Christmas event.  As kids we went on a field trip with Abraham and Sarah.  There was that moment in middle school when we were really geeky, asking for kings like other nations, not listening to God’s prophets wondering what it was the Isaiah, Jeremiah and all those others were saying.  And now as full blown adults God has taken us out and invited us to Bethlehem for a kiss.

The Birth of Christ isn’t just about the birth of a baby.  God is attempting to touch our soul.  Christmas is about beginnings.  There was a young wife and mother of two children whose husband was in the Air Force during one of the nation’s military conflicts. As Christmas approached, she gathered her children and headed for her parents’ home for the Christmas celebration. She arrived to find her parents’ home gaily decorated. The tree was glistening with lights and the presents were crammed beneath it. And, although her husband could not be present, it promised to be a happy time together.

Then, on Christmas Eve, came the news that her husband had been killed in combat, and the woman was devastated. While she was upstairs crying in her room, her parents, who now felt that the decorations were suddenly inappropriate, began to take them down. The lights were unplugged and the gifts put in a closet. Later, when the new widow came down the stairs, she saw the decorations gone and the tree darkened. “Where is everything?” she asked. When her father explained, the young woman, with a wisdom beyond her years, said, “No. Bring them back! Christmas was made for such times as these.”  God touching our soul.

 It’s not just a boy.  God is being vulnerable with us.  Jesus is a baby, a human baby. He cries, he poops, he has colic, and Mary watch out, he is going to have questions and doubts and fears.  Jesus is a baby. The all-powerful God lays aside all that cosmic power and makes himself able to get sick, able to bleed, able to experience heartache, able to be killed.  Jesus is a baby who will grow into a man to receive a kiss from Judas.

It’s not just a boy.  God is sharing the Divine-Self wholly.  All those moments with Moses and Elijah, Amos and Malachi and all those other names in the Old Testament we can’t pronounce were flirts and glances.  Tonight is the first kiss. God shares all love and all that God is in a baby.  In Christ we experience the awesome holy nature of God fully.

You can read romance novels about sitting next to the one you love. You can hear stories about how they looked at one another and saw fireworks.  You can sing songs about the passionate kisses and the heat of the moment.  But until you lean in and experience a kiss – you’ll never know what kissing is.

Tonight is a kiss from God.  The anticipation and excitement of Advent is over.  We don’t have to be worried because God who made our lips knows what kind of person we are.  Tonight God invites us to salvation wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.  We all know that awkwardness of kissing someone who isn’t kissing back.  Won’t you come to Bethlehem with Jesus tonight?  Won’t you receive the gift God is giving this Christmas?